open.conted.ox.ac.uk (beta)

Open Educational Resources

‘Doing All Possible Good’: Parallel Models of Social Responsibility in the Evangelical Theology of John Wesley and Hannah More by Rachel Xhemajli

Abstract: Evangelicalism gets a lot of raised eyebrows. Nonetheless, it holds a significant place in history. Beginning in the eighteenth century, evangelicalism’s most pivotal figure was John Wesley (1703–1791), the founder of Methodism. He was known for preaching an active faith through his dynamic theology. Hannah More (1745–1833), a prominent member of England’s evangelical Clapham Sect, produced the widely successful Cheap Repository Tracts, which were largely written sermons within a fictional framework. In comparing Wesley’s sermon ‘The Use of Money’ (first preached in the 1740s) with More’s tract ‘The Two Wealthy Farmers’ (its first part published in 1795), a striking parallel emerges. Within a dichotomous age of overabundance and destitution, Wesley and More’s view of social responsibility offered an alternative perspective with its own distinctly evangelical social model. It becomes clear that they believed that implementing this model would tangibly and considerably reorganize society for the better — in a non-radical, non-revolutionary way.

Date created: 
Monday, June 6, 2022
Attribution for this resource:
‘Doing All Possible Good’: Parallel Models of Social Responsibility in the Evangelical Theology of John Wesley and Hannah More by Rachel Xhemajli, All rights reserved.
Subjects: 
Courses using this resource: