open.conted.ox.ac.uk (beta)

Open Educational Resources

From Avalon To Paddington Station: William Dyce And The Victorian Reinterpretation Of Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur, Tom Poynor

In 1851 the painter William Dyce (1806-1864) unveiled his painting Religion: The Vision of Sir Galahad and his Company in the Queen's Robing Room in the new House of Lords. The painting depicts the conflation of two scenes from Le Morte D'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory (1405-1471). Arthurian Romance had not yet achieved the popularity it would gain in the latter half of the nineteenth century and contained thematic material disturbing to many Victorians. The fact that the story of the Holy Grail is heavily influenced by medieval Catholic piety proved particularly contentious for Dyce's primarily protestant audience. This article compares portions of Malory's text on the quest for the Holy Grail with the evolution of Dyce's painting and demonstrates how Dyce worked to revise a medieval text for a nineteenth-century audience.

Date created: 
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
Attribution for this resource:
From Avalon To Paddington Station: William Dyce And The Victorian Reinterpretation Of Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur, Tom Poynor, All rights reserved.
Keywords: 
Courses using this resource: