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Women and the Indian Mutiny: Framing the Mutiny in a Punch Cartoon and a Lucknow Diary, Anna Matei

Artefacts and news coverage created in Britain during the Indian mutiny represented and interpreted that conflict, creating meaning for the public and the victims of the mutiny. Tenniel’s Punch cartoon ‘The British Lion’s Vengeance on the Bengal Tiger’ and Katherine Bartrum’s Lucknow diary constructed meaning through dialogue with national and sectional culture. Both wanted to be understood, and so used and linked elements of British and narrower community tradition to create their representations. In the process, they constructed women’s place in the mutiny too, but while one focused on women as symbolic victims, the other represented their real, personal suffering.

Date created: 
Thursday, April 30, 2015
Attribution for this resource:
Women and the Indian Mutiny: Framing the Mutiny in a Punch Cartoon and a Lucknow Diary, Anna Matei, All rights reserved.
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