open.conted.ox.ac.uk (beta)

Open Educational Resources

Character In Modernist Fiction

“On or about December 1910," Virginia Woolf famously wrote, "human character changed". So too did characters in fiction. This course explores the new approaches to characterisation used by four modernist novelists: Joyce, Ford, Woolf and Lawrence.

Date created:

2012-01-11 12:49
Tutor: 
Course type: 

Resources for this course

Displaying 1 - 15 of 15
Type Resource Description People Full details
Link Virginia Woolf, “Mr Bennett and Mrs Brown”

originally a talk read by Virginia Woolf to The Heretics Club ( includes brief introduction)

view
Document Modern Fiction

Virginia Woolf, “Modern Fiction” from The Common Reader

Carol Peaker view
Link Tradition and the Individual Talent

T.S. Eliot “Tradition and the Individual Talent” (1919)

view
Link Why the Novel Matters

D.H. Lawrence, “Why the Novel Matters” (1925)

view
Link DH Lawrence Website at the University of Nottingham

DH Lawrence Website at the University of Nottingham

view
Link Art and Morality

D.H. Lawrence, “Art and Morality” (1925)

view
Link The Modernism Lab at Yale University

The Modernism Lab at Yale University: An excellent source of essays on Modernist writers

view
Link Scottish Network of Modernist Studies

Scottish Network of Modernist Studies

view
Link "Pointed Roofs" by Dorothy Richardson

The full text of "Pointed Roofs" by Dorothy Richardson

view
Link Dorothy Richardson website

Dorothy Richardson website

view
Link The Spirit of the People, an analysis of the English mind

An online reproduction of Ford Madox Hueffer (Ford) The Spirit of the People, an analysis of the English mind (1907):

view
Link Professions for Women

"Professions for Women"essay by Virginia Woolf.

view
Document Modernism Chronology

A timeline of Significant Moments in Modernism

Carol Peaker view
Document Modernist essay topics

Essay topics for the course Character In Modernist Fiction

Carol Peaker view
Document Some Features of Modernism (1890–1939)

Handout exploring key features of modernism, including rejection of ossified forms of expression, rebellion against traditional moral and social...

Carol Peaker view